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What are you reading on Stoicism & Stoic philosophy?


BigSeneca
(@bigseneca)
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Am currently reading: The Cambridge Companion to Stoics by Brad Inwood. Is the perfect book for those seeking to perfect their inner stoic. Anybody can be a philosopher. It all depends on the amount of effort you put in it. This book will shorten your journey to being a stoic with practical examples. 

This book offers an odyssey through the ideas of the Stoics in three ways: 

  • Through the historical trajectory of the school itself and its influence;
  • The recovery of the history of Stoic thought;
  • And finally, the ongoing confrontation with Stoicism
This topic was modified 6 months ago by amorfati

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Levis
(@levis)
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Am currently reading: The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom, Perseverance, and the Art of Living by Ryan Holiday, Stephen Hanselman. This book offers 366 insights and practical exercises from Marcus Aurelius to playwright Seneca. This simple exercises are easy to implement and can be done in small incremental order to help you attain stoicism and lead a happy and fulflilled life. The fact that they have been divided into 366 days makes them easy and fun to follow through. 


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Martha_yoga
(@martha_yoga)
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Am reading How to Think Like a Roman Emperor - The Stoic Philosophy of Marcus Aurelius by Donald J. Robertson. I have just stared on it, it is an awesome read. This book takes you to a transformative journey along with Marcus, following his progress from a young noble at the court of Hadrian—taken under the wing of some of the finest philosophers of his day—through to his reign as emperor of Rome at the height of its power. Robertson shows how Marcus used philosophical doctrines and therapeutic practices to build emotional resilience and endure tremendous adversity and guides readers through applying the same methods to their own lives.


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Untapped_Lewis
(@untapped_lewis)
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I started reading: A guide to the good life - The ancient art of Stoic joy by William Braxton Irvine last week. This book elaborates the great fears many of us face is that despite all our effort and striving, we will discover at the end that we have wasted our life. In A Guide to the Good Life, William B. Irvine plumbs the wisdom of Stoic philosophy, one of the most popular and successful schools of thought in ancient Rome, and shows how its insight and advice are still remarkably applicable to modern lives.

In A Guide to the Good Life, Irvine offers a refreshing presentation of Stoicism, showing how this ancient philosophy can still direct us toward a better life. Using the psychological insights and the practical techniques of the Stoics, Irvine offers a roadmap for anyone seeking to avoid the feelings of chronic dissatisfaction that plague so many of us. Irvine looks at various Stoic techniques for attaining tranquility and shows how to put these techniques to work in our own life. As he does so, he describes his own experiences practicing Stoicism and offers valuable first-hand advice for anyone wishing to live better by following


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EverlyneBrown
(@everlynebrown)
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The past two weeks i have been "binge reading": Stoicism and the Art of Happiness - Practical Wisdom for Everyday Life by Donald Robertso. It is a classic book that show us that stoics lived a long time ago, but they had some startling insights into the human condition - insights which endure to this day.

The philosophical tradition, founded in Athens by Zeno of Citium in 301 BC, endured as an active movement for almost 500 years, and contributions from dazzling minds such as Cicero, Seneca and Marcus Aurelius helped create a body of thought with an extraordinary goal - to provide a rational, healthy way of living in harmony with the nature of the universe and in respect of our relationships with each other.

This simple, empowering book shows how to use this ancient wisdom to make practical, positive changes to your life. Using thought-provoking case studies, highlighting key ideas and things to remember and providing tools for self-assessment, it demonstrates that Stoicism is a proven, profound pathway to happiness.


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Forum - The Stoic Forum
(@susan06)
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I just read The Prophet by Khalil Gibran, lovely book, loved every chapter. The best part and most memorable line I found was, "love has no desire but to fullfil itself". 


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Walikirito
(@walikirito)
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A few great books when getting into stoicism that I've found to work really well and would like to share here are
Stillness is the key &
The obstacle is the way
Hope that you read these are they are gems of knowledge that those who need them are really good for.


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Forum - The Stoic Forum
(@susan06)
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That is a wonderful book, I would say it's been my tool that has helped me in figuring out how we should always take an obstacle a small bump in the way as a boost in achieving your goal. 


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Walikirito
(@walikirito)
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Well for me I'm currently reading stillness is the key. Its an amazing dive into sometimes not reacting when all hell breaks lose can help you make more logical decisions in situations where emotions can take a front row seat at driving our choices and actions.


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