I am weirdly okay w...
 
Notifications
Clear all

I am weirdly okay with dying now


Jacob Stephens
(@jacobstoic)
Noble Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 63
Topic starter  

I've been thinking a lot about negative visualization and imagining the worst possible scenarios and becoming okay with them. this ultimately led me to the question, "what if I die tomorrow?", and now that I've accepted it, it feels so freeing. It's like nothing really scares me anymore. I think a lot of this is also because I've been viewing stoicism through a Christian lens. In Christianity, we are taught to never be afraid or worried about anything because God will always be there for us (I'm oversimplifying it, but that's the gist). It's not a suicidal thought, even though I have been suicidal before. I don't want to die, I like being alive, but if I were to die I know I'd be alright. I'm not sure why people struggle so much with the idea of an inevitable death now, Christian or not. Yes, it seems scary, but once you accept that it is inevitable you just kind of stop worrying about it.

I also want to add that I feel like negative visualization is more about being accepting of the things you can't change. If you feel like you aren't living up to your own potential that's different because you are capable of changing that. Imminent death, however, is completely out of your control and fighting it will only cause unnecessary stress.


lainedunc liked
Quote
Topic Tags
frankrichardson1979
(@frankrichardson1979)
Noble Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 61
 

You won't always be okay with dying, but that's alright as well. While deaths cares not what we think, it's alright to be afraid of it. Living a life of virtue and accepting the things we cannot change is the essence of stoicism, but remember that having fear can be a virtue as well. What you are afraid of matters more than fear itself.

"Death smiles at us all, but all a man can do is smile back." - Marcus Aurelius

While we live, we can smile at death. When we die, we can be afraid and that is alright.


ReplyQuote
gardnermcgee
(@gardnermcgee)
Noble Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 64
 

There is an animated Disney movie from 2020 called Soul. A story of a Jazz musician caught in a world that human souls pass through on their way into and out of life. In the first scene after the musician's death, he finds himself in the 'Great Before,' the transitional space between life and Nirvana. He is on a moving walkway towards THE ONE, the source. And that's the end. No rebirths from Hinduism. No heavens of Christianity. Just a moving walkway to the source. And you find him running away from the source. The yogic sutras paint the same picture too, where you move towards unification with THE ONE after your death. There is the law of karma, of course, and you can't just leave the cycle of rebirths if you have a disbalance in your karma points. Got to settle that before getting to Nirvana. Okay? So technically, death is just a transition and as long as you lived a good life, kept your karma game in check, you're good. You can even be like Aurelius, smile back at the death. Hell eya. Why not.


ReplyQuote
Richard Hawkins
(@richardhawkins)
Noble Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 60
 

I see you're point and relate to it, but I also feel like negative visualization applies to that to. What if you didn't live a meaningful life? As long as you are doing what you know is right, something that is under your control, there is no need to be afraid.


ReplyQuote
Margaux Dizon
(@margaux)
Noble Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 60
 

I feel the same way. I won’t accept dying tomorrow, because there are countless things I haven’t done yet. I don’t even feel like I’ve ever lived, how could I die before I felt alive? That might be my depression though. I’ve been trying to change my outlook to live a better and more fulfilling life, but I’m a coward. I’m incredibly judgemental of myself and I can’t really stop the thoughts.

I’m just new when it comes to Stoicism, and reading these kinds of posts sometimes gives me hope. I'm also a Christian and I agree that God is always there to guide us. Fear of the unknown is just human. People who can acknowledge the cruelty of life and do whatever in their power to make their life the best that it can be, makes me hopeful that I can be that way at some point.

This post was modified 5 months ago by Margaux Dizon

ReplyQuote
lainedunc
(@lainedunc)
Noble Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 61
 
Posted by: @jacobstoic

I've been thinking a lot about negative visualization and imagining the worst possible scenarios and becoming okay with them. this ultimately led me to the question, "what if I die tomorrow?", and now that I've accepted it, it feels so freeing. It's like nothing really scares me anymore. I think a lot of this is also because I've been viewing stoicism through a Christian lens. In Christianity, we are taught to never be afraid or worried about anything because God will always be there for us (I'm oversimplifying it, but that's the gist). It's not a suicidal thought, even though I have been suicidal before. I don't want to die, I like being alive, but if I were to die I know I'd be alright. I'm not sure why people struggle so much with the idea of an inevitable death now, Christian or not. Yes, it seems scary, but once you accept that it is inevitable you just kind of stop worrying about it.

I also want to add that I feel like negative visualization is more about being accepting of the things you can't change. If you feel like you aren't living up to your own potential that's different because you are capable of changing that. Imminent death, however, is completely out of your control and fighting it will only cause unnecessary stress.

I get it generally,  but I have a question. I follow Christianity and Stoicism and have found solace about death in both. It seemed you were starting to say the Christian path is not for you or at least did not do it for you?

I'm not ragging, I'm just seeking clarification because I feel your post.

 


ReplyQuote
Chistopher
(@chistopher)
Estimable Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 23
 

The way I see it, I have no say over how other people live their lives or where they end up in the afterlife. Life will play out as it does. I'm responsible for myself, for living life in accordance to my moral code. As long as I do that I don't fear anything because I have faith that God is just and he will ultimately decide what's right. This moral code helps me a lot. It doesn't have to be a religious morality but just a firm conviction in the virtue of your actions.


ReplyQuote
Share: